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Re: Daleks (thread)

uk.rec.gardening

Posted: 3 Days 5 Hours ago by: alan_m

Designed by someone that has never used one? Have you noticed the adverts for these bins often show someone pulling out perfect light weight fluffy compost from the little door. I suspect for marketing purposes they first filled the bi

Re: Blueberry (thread)

uk.rec.gardening

Posted: 4 Days 23 Hours ago by: Jonathan Ward

Have you checked the stems for parasites. Ther is one which attacks our gosseberry that looks like a dried brown blister. Sorry cannot remember its name but insecticide kills it. Jonathan

Re: Blueberry (thread)

uk.rec.gardening

Posted: 5 Days 16 Hours ago by: Nick Maclaren

Just as they used to attribute tree deaths to honey fungus, even when it demonstrably wasn't. There are a zillion pathogens that attack roots, and generally they behave similarly. Regards, Nick Maclaren.

Re: Daleks (thread)

uk.rec.gardening

Posted: 6 Days 5 Hours ago by: Charlie Pridham

As mentioned by multiple folk in the other replies above, most people lift them off, you can then get at the contents a lot more easily

Re: Blueberry (thread)

uk.rec.gardening

Posted: 7 Days 18 Hours ago by: Martin Brown

Overwatering is a possibility but disease is also a possibility. Flinging the dead one into the general household waste stream ASAP might be the least bad option at this stage and sterilise any tools you have used on the potentially in

Re: Daleks (thread)

uk.rec.gardening

Posted: 7 Days 20 Hours ago by: Rob H

Mine has a door and I open to take out the bottom rotted compost. if it didn't have one , how else would it be done.

Re: Blueberry (thread)

uk.rec.gardening

Posted: 7 Days 21 Hours ago by: Jeff Layman

Sudden death can be due to many things, but the most likely is root damage which prevents the plant taking up water. It can turn from apparently healthy to dead in a very short time. There are a number of pathogenic organisms which cou

Blueberry

uk.rec.gardening

Posted: 7 Days 22 Hours ago by: Polly@golly

I have 2 bluebeery bushes in pots that have grown and produced well for the last 2/3 years. They are different varieties, one coming on a bit earlier than the other. Last year the early on grew upto abound 4ft tall as well as giving a go

Re: Daleks (thread)

uk.rec.gardening

Posted: 7 Days 23 Hours ago by: Charlie Pridham

That is indeed a good question, two of our older bins have no door

Re: Daleks (thread)

uk.rec.gardening

Posted: 10 Days 20 Hours ago by: Another John

Nice one Jeff :) Here's another non-serious answer: It's just a sales pitch: when these were introduced, I remember that one of the miraculous claims was: "Put garden refuse in, shovel rich compost out!"

Re: Daleks (thread)

uk.rec.gardening

Posted: 11 Days 20 Hours ago by: Jeff Layman

That's for use in Australia, where they put the stuff for composting through the door at the bottom, and take the good stuff out of the top. ;-)

Re: Felco secateurs - which model for general pruning? (thread)

uk.rec.gardening

Posted: 11 Days 21 Hours ago by: David

The rotating handle won the day. Brief trials are impressive. Guerilla pruning was also a success. Now to concentrate on not losing them! Cheers Dave R -- AMD FX-6300 in GA-990X-Gaming SLI-CF running Windows 7 Pro x64

Re: Daleks (thread)

uk.rec.gardening

Posted: 11 Days 21 Hours ago by: Polly@golly

Thank you for all the adice/comments, but it does raise one question1 Why is there a small impractical door in the Dalek in the first place?

Re: Daleks (thread)

uk.rec.gardening

Posted: 12 Days 3 Hours ago by: The Natural Philosop

Mortuary slabs one presumes. Sounds like a plan, but how did you get the rats on the slabs in the first place?

Re: Daleks (thread)

uk.rec.gardening

Posted: 12 Days 4 Hours ago by: Charlie Pridham

We had the same problem with rats as Bob (they eat the worms) but now have them on slabs, also like Bob we either lift if off and set aside the top layers but more often because we have several we just start using a different one unti

Re: Daleks (thread)

uk.rec.gardening

Posted: 17 Days 3 Hours ago by: Another John

He needs a tarpaulin, reasonably robust and pretty large (something like 4mx2m): Aldi sell these from time to time, but you'll always get one from places like Homebase. He spreads the tarpaulin on the patio, then sorts out the content

Re: Daleks (thread)

uk.rec.gardening

Posted: 17 Days 17 Hours ago by: Chris Hogg

Lift Dalek and put to one side, temporarily, exposing the compost. Remove un-rotted compost from top of the pile and put in a poly sack. Remove well-rotted compost and put in another sack. Return Dalek to its original position. Put un-ro

Re: Daleks (thread)

uk.rec.gardening

Posted: 17 Days 18 Hours ago by: Polly@golly

Thats fine if you've got the space. In this case the Dalek was in a corner surrounded by plants and he has no other space for it apart from putting it in the corned of a patio with slabs underneath!

Re: Protecting buckthorn from ants . . . (thread)

uk.rec.gardening

Posted: 17 Days 22 Hours ago by: RJH

That's great, many thanks! I'll try the soapy water . . .

Re: Daleks (thread)

uk.rec.gardening

Posted: 18 Days ago by: Bob Hobden

From what I've seen on our allotments you simply lift it all up and move the Dalek putting the new stuff back in leaving a pile of usable compost. We had one for years but the rats kept digging the good stuff out so we never actually got a

Re: Protecting buckthorn from ants . . . (thread)

uk.rec.gardening

Posted: 18 Days 3 Hours ago by: Chris Hogg

They're probably being attracted to greenfly, milking them for their sweet exudate aka honeydew. The greenfly congregate on the growing tips of your buckthorn because the tissues there are soft and the greenfly can get their 'teeth' into

Protecting buckthorn from ants . . .

uk.rec.gardening

Posted: 18 Days 5 Hours ago by: RJH

How can I stop ants crawling over my newly planted (well, a year ago) buckthorn plants? They seem to be chewing at leaves, and congregate around the branch ends as new leaves seem to be trying to grow. I'd like to deter, not kill, and avoi

Daleks

uk.rec.gardening

Posted: 18 Days 17 Hours ago by: Polly@golly

A friend has one of these contraptions and has asked for advice. He has been filling it for a couple of years and now wants to use SOME of the compost it has produced. Opened up the little door at the bottom and started shovelling out th

Re: Mealy-bugs. (thread)

uk.rec.gardening

Posted: 19 Days 2 Hours ago by: Primrose

Thank you, yes I think you are right, they are on the branches rather than the leaves. Thanks very much for you advice, I'll try the meths.

Re: Mealy-bugs. (thread)

uk.rec.gardening

Posted: 19 Days 3 Hours ago by: Martin Brown

Outdoors? Much more likely to be woolly aphid. Mealy bug is more a pest of house plants. Stiff paint brush with meths on is my favoured treatment for woolly aphid and mealybug. Keep doing it regularly as a spot treatment. Soft soap o

Mealy-bugs.

uk.rec.gardening

Posted: 20 Days 2 Hours ago by: Primrose

I've got a bad infestation of mealy-bugs on my Viburnum this year. I found some sites that recommended diluted Neem oil. Has anyone tried this with success?

allium leaf miner

uk.rec.gardening

Posted: 21 Days 5 Hours ago by: Bill Davy

I think our allotments have a serious outbreak of this on onions, shallots, etc. Perhaps it was the weather. Advice seems rather drastic. https://www.gardenfocused.co.uk/fruitarticles/pest-disease/allium-leaf-miner.php says "When the o

Re: What's eating my tomato plants? (thread)

uk.rec.gardening

Posted: 22 Days 5 Hours ago by: Adrian Brentnall

Thanks Bill. I make stained-glass for a living, so copper-tape is something I have a fair bit of... At the moment I've slit back the ground-cover fabric a bit, and laft a sprinkling of slug-pellets around the tomatoes and cucumbers. W

Re: What's eating my tomato plants? (thread)

uk.rec.gardening

Posted: 22 Days 6 Hours ago by: Bill Davy

FWIW: Get a piece of drainpipe. Mine was cylindrical, about 5" diameter. Buy a roll of copper adhesive tape. I bought Kraftex UK - Copper Foil Tape, 6 yards long, 2 Inches Wide for £13 but I dare say one can do better. Slit pipe in

Re: Looking for (very) lightweight grass trimmer recommendations (thread)

uk.rec.gardening

Posted: 23 Days 1 Hour ago by: Another John

(Sorry _ Chris Green said that, not Charlie). John

Re: Looking for (very) lightweight grass trimmer recommendations (thread)

uk.rec.gardening

Posted: 23 Days 1 Hour ago by: Another John

I bought one from Homebase two years ago: ISTR that it cost £24.00. It's cordless, very light, uses very light cord (which I have never yet had to renew), and is (relatively) _very_ quiet. I use it for things exactly like your M-I-

Re: What's eating my tomato plants? (thread)

uk.rec.gardening

Posted: 23 Days 5 Hours ago by: Adrian Brentnall

Thanks Nick. We've not had this problem before (had much the same setup since 2006). It seems that whatever it is is quite selective, and goes for smaller / younger stems.. I've some slug pellets down there now, and I've slit the ground

Re: What's eating my tomato plants? (thread)

uk.rec.gardening

Posted: 24 Days 2 Hours ago by: Nick Maclaren

It means softer than that - or, at least, it should. I have never seen them do that in 40+ years, but have seen it done by very small (often 5mm) slugs. Regards, Nick Maclaren.

Re: What's eating my tomato plants? (thread)

uk.rec.gardening

Posted: 24 Days 15 Hours ago by: Adrian Brentnall

Done the pellets as well <grin> The web seems to think that woodlice will eat younger / softer plant material - which sort of makes sense as the stems which have been eaten aren't the older, better-established plants.....

Re: What's eating my tomato plants? (thread)

uk.rec.gardening

Posted: 24 Days 19 Hours ago by: Chris Hogg

I thought woodlice had very soft mouthparts, too soft to do any damage to living plants. They eat decayed matter - it's all they can cope with. Get the pellets!

Re: What's eating my tomato plants? (thread)

uk.rec.gardening

Posted: 24 Days 20 Hours ago by: Adrian Brentnall

Actually - having taken a closer look - I think the woodlice might be the culprits... Lifted up some of the ground-cover fabric, and large numbers of them went shuffling off, whistling nonchalantly... Have lifted the ground-cover back

Re: What's eating my tomato plants? (thread)

uk.rec.gardening

Posted: 24 Days 21 Hours ago by: Adrian Brentnall

I suppose that's a possibility. Don't have a lot of slug issues in the tunnel - but there could be the odd one.... and the area around each plant is covered with weed-supressing fabric - which could make a handy place for the little bl

Re: What's eating my tomato plants? (thread)

uk.rec.gardening

Posted: 24 Days 21 Hours ago by: Chris Hogg

Suggesting the obvious...slugs? Wouldn't do any harm to scatter a few pellets.

Re: What's eating my tomato plants? (thread)

uk.rec.gardening

Posted: 24 Days 22 Hours ago by: Adrian Brentnall

Ah - bad luck on the deer (lovely things, but they'll eat anything). Pretty sure that bunnies and hares can't get inside my polytunnel - and whatever the culprit is, it hasn't actually munched through the stems - just eaten the outside

Re: What's eating my tomato plants? (thread)

uk.rec.gardening

Posted: 24 Days 23 Hours ago by: The Natural Philosop

You are lucky, with me its the lowest 2' of anything. Roe deer. Yours sounds like bunnies. Or hares

What's eating my tomato plants?

uk.rec.gardening

Posted: 25 Days 1 Hour ago by: Adrian Brentnall

HI Folks Would welcome any ideas as to what's eating my tomato plants? We've grown tomato plants in our polytunnel over here in the far south-west of Co Cork, Ireland for many years - but this is the first year that we've had this probl

Re: Looking for (very) lightweight grass trimmer recommendations (thread)

uk.rec.gardening

Posted: 27 Days 4 Hours ago by: Charlie Pridham

I have a cheap lightweight cordless and have been very pleased with it, make is Macallister I think

Re: What to grow? (thread)

uk.rec.gardening

Posted: 28 Days 3 Hours ago by: Janet

In article <t75oa3$f9t$1@dont-email.me>, pwllgloyw@gmail.com says... rhubarb, parsley, rocket, chard, beetroot Janet

Re: Looking for (very) lightweight grass trimmer recommendations (thread)

uk.rec.gardening

Posted: 28 Days 3 Hours ago by: Andy Burns

GTech battery vacuums seem popular with older users, I notice they've started advertising trimmers/mowers etc ... no experience of them.

Looking for (very) lightweight grass trimmer recommendations

uk.rec.gardening

Posted: 28 Days 4 Hours ago by: Chris Green

My M-I-L wants a grass trimmer to tidy grass around pots etc. at the edge of our lawn. She is quite infirm so she wants something as light as possible. It's also quite likely that it will get little or no use so we don't want to spend a l

What to grow?

uk.rec.gardening

Posted: 28 Days 18 Hours ago by: Polly@golly

Following a re-vamping of part of the garden, I now have a small area for growing more vegetables. The only problem is that 2 sides have 5ft high fences around then, and the third side a garage! The only open side faces NNE and thus get

Re: Rhododendron flowers (thread)

uk.rec.gardening

Posted: 28 Days 18 Hours ago by: Polly@golly

Yes, I had this on my small azelea's last year, where the flower petals just turned brown/dry and stayed put! Looks as if it might be happening again this year, although I have jad to sweep up quite a few flowers from the paths. It has

Re: Orchid fertiliser (thread)

uk.rec.gardening

Posted: 28 Days 19 Hours ago by: Jeff Layman

I wonder if the Baby Bio stuff is intended more for those special orchids rather than the bog-standard phalaenopsis sold in most supermarkets. Many years ago I was given a small jar of a specialist orchid fertilizer (a previous version

Re: Orchid fertiliser (thread)

uk.rec.gardening

Posted: 28 Days 20 Hours ago by: Jim S

In article <ckbc9htevf3423ti5p0olj9t8tltm1f5ud@4ax.com>, me@privacy.net says... Thanks. I've had one before and the supplier this time (Kolibri) have a good site. It is just my basic meanness that suspects them and Bio of wanting to sel

Re: Orchid fertiliser (thread)

uk.rec.gardening

Posted: 28 Days 21 Hours ago by: Chris Hogg

I would use it just according to the instructions on the bottle - add 5 - 10 drops of Baby Bio orchid fertiliser to a pint of water, and water your orchid with the solution. How do you water it? I'm no expert in that, but AIUI orchids a

Orchid fertiliser

uk.rec.gardening

Posted: 28 Days 22 Hours ago by: Jim S

I have a single orchid. There will come a time shortly when I should consider a feed. I see that Baby Bio and others, do a special orchid fertiliser, but for a single plant would the basic Baby Bio suffice, if I change the dilution perh

Re: Anothe 'coming true from seed' question. (thread)

uk.rec.gardening

Posted: 29 Days 5 Hours ago by: Charlie Pridham

Once went to a talk by the National collection holder, most of their named forms they did from basal cuttings, but some were seed strains and came largely true. Ours have had a good year this year and we have fallen in love with them

Rhododendron flowers

uk.rec.gardening

Posted: 29 Days 6 Hours ago by: Chris Hogg

Usually, after flowering, my rhodos and deciduous azaleas drop their petals neatly, leaving only the stigmas than can be fairly easily removed by hand to discourage seed pod growth (if you want to make the effort). This year has been differ

Re: Anothe 'coming true from seed' question. (thread)

uk.rec.gardening

Posted: 29 Days 21 Hours ago by: Jim Jackson

I think generally double blooms don't produce much, if any, seed. So you may have to propogate vegetatively. RHS recommends basals cuttings.

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